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work past and future

Thanks so much to Armadillo magazine for reviewing the six books in the DFC Library, and particularly for their write-up about Vern and Lettuce here! You even get a peek at one of the pages. (The tower block in the second panel is based on the Clifton Estate in Peckham.)


Read the whole strip here!

The Amazon link goes to Monkey Nuts instead of Vern and Lettuce - also a FINE BOOK! - but here's the working link.

You might have read the writer and illustrator Philip Reeve's somewhat pessimistic blog post about the future of the book. When I read it, I was about to write a comment, but then I realised I had no way of knowing where the book would be in 40 years or so. So I decided to wait 40 years and then send him a letter about how books are all the rage now. I dashed it off, it's just a bit of fun, but Philip's posted the whole thing over here on his blog:


Click here to see the whole letter

Just a couple other things: Someone's made a LEGO version of the Cutty Sark clipper ship! (The Cutty Sark is one of my oldest clients. Before the fire, I used to be Ship's Illustrator! (There's a rather long story in that.) I hear that restoration work's progressing well.

And I'm bookmarking this link to The British Postal Museum & Archive. So many lovely stamps, posters, cards, envelopes and photos to trawl through, and I'm such a fan of real letters on paper. My New Year's Resolution at the start of this year was to write more letters, and I made a comic/short story about it that you can read online called Dear David Lasky.

Comments

( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
(Anonymous)
Dec. 16th, 2010 02:36 pm (UTC)
British Postal Museum
Dear Sarah,
My 13 year old groaned the other week as he set off to school (Forest Gate Comprehensive in London E7) because they were having a visit from someone from the Postal Museum. He came home really enthusiastic about stamps - whoever the visitor was she sure knew how to generate interest among a group of teenagers. Now there is a skill I'd like to bottle.

My nine year daughter, Marcella, has become a regular visitor to your blog. Not only does she love Vern and Lettuce but she is a member of the Discover Children's Forum and is so looking forward to the monster exhibition.

Really miss the Cutty Sark looming large on emerging from the foot tunnel.

Best wishes,

Joan
jabberworks
Dec. 16th, 2010 10:16 pm (UTC)
Re: British Postal Museum
Hi, Joan!

Thanks so much for your lovely message! I'm envious of your 13-year-old, I'd loved to have had a visit from the Postal Museum when I was at school (or now, actually)! I still have my stamp collection that I made at that age; some of the designs are very inspiring, and I sometimes reuse them in artwork. I hope I'll get to design some stamps some day! I've seen some lovely ones by Sara Fanelli and Quentin Blake.

Oo, I think Marcella will be in for a treat with Monsterville. And yes, I'm also looking forward to the return of the Cutty Sark. They've asked me to come back as illustrator, but I have to work out how it could fit around the book work, and fees and all that, so still not sure if I can do it or not. I loved being a part of the team, though. That was a lot of fun.

Best wishes to you and your family!
darkwaterfrey
Dec. 16th, 2010 07:01 pm (UTC)
Simply wonderful!
jabberworks
Dec. 16th, 2010 10:16 pm (UTC)
Cheers! :)
jimbocomics
Dec. 17th, 2010 02:32 pm (UTC)
I really love how Vern and Lettuce is so thoroughly set in the England of today. I think it takes an American living abroad to do that. We English spend too much time idealising and trying to block out unsightly things like tower blocks. Generally, we live in our imaginations and our imaginations don't look like the world around us. I love how an oppressive grey block of flats seems warm and natural in your drawings. There's something optimistic about that.
jabberworks
Dec. 17th, 2010 05:22 pm (UTC)
Aw, thanks so much for that, James! It's fun drawing blocks of flats, and so many comics people do the 'urban, gritty' thing that it's kind of fun to try taking it in a little different direction.
( 6 comments — Leave a comment )